Films in May

New releases
Avengers: Infinity War
I would generally say that I’m a big fan of the Marvel cinematic universe. I’ve always been impressed with how they can make each character completely real, and each film completely its own style, and yet then blend them together to make one coherent whole. The Avengers films have always been the biggest challenge in that regard, and Infinity War sets a new level of insanity on that front having to bring about 2 dozen characters together, crossing genres and personalities to bring all the individual stars together without losing their individuality. Just like the previous films, I think it’s an almost impossible challenge and yet somehow, it works. The gradual coalescence of the groups supports both characters and audience through the transition, personalities can still shine through and relationships can be established before it turns into a giant scrum.

There are casualties. Many characters get little more than a cameo, very few get anything resembling character development and some previous characters didn’t make the cut at all. There’s also not much depth to the plot, it’s a fairly straightforward quest story and it is a little rushed, even in the longer run time. But I was never bored, never confused and always entertained by the dialogue and the visuals.

My personal problem was that knowing the overall runtime of the film, knowing it was the first of two parts, and knowing the rumours of major character deaths (the trailer lays it on pretty thick), I had expectations. So early moments that seem to solve the problem were obviously not going to work, I knew there wouldn’t be a tidy ending (although I was impressed with the way they did close out the film).

I didn’t love this film as much as previous ones, but that’s possibly almost all down to the fact it’s not the end, so it’s hard to come out feeling complete. I did enjoy it a lot, and was certainly impressed that they managed to make it work. I think though I won’t be able to judge it completely until part two next year.

Deadpool 2
Deadpool 2 is unfortunately two films mushed together and it doesn’t work. On the plus side, there’s the Deadpool bits. The hilariously inappropriate violence, language and crudeness that you’d expect alongside the breaking of the 4th wall and in jokes. So many elements of the film work so well together and feel fresh and original, everything from the music choices to the brilliantly directed and choreographed action sequences that were genuinely interesting to watch for a change.
But you know there’s a but coming, and it’s a big one. There’s just too much emotion at the forefront of the story. From the ‘unfortunate event’ and the theme of parenthood that runs through the film it just didn’t feel like Deadpool. There were a lot of scenes that I was waiting for the punch line and was left with just a pure emotional moment that didn’t feel at all in the right film. It wasn’t even done very well, it was utterly lacking in subtlety and the kind of story that we’ve seen play out hundreds of times before.
There were plenty of scenes and moments that were brilliant, but there were a number of places that I was bored and the film dragged and overall I came away feeling rather disappointed.

Cargo (Netflix)
Zombies are a crowded genre, so it’s hard to find a new take on them, particularly once The Walking Dead has covered so much ground. But this Australian, Netflix film somehow manages to feel original, while not really being terribly original at all. As with most zombie films, there’s no pre-amble, we’re thrown straight into the post apocalypse with a couple of survivors and almost immediately their just-about-stable existence is thrown out again. The only truly original thing is the Australian outback setting which is used to very good effect (although levels of population density don’t necessarily play to any rules except dramatic necessity). The other thing that holds the whole thing together is the incomparable Martin Freeman who brings not just the expected humour, but absolutely heart-breaking emotion too.

New for me
God’s Own Country (Netflix) – Really good. It’s a slow burn and there were times early on that just left me a bit bored and rolling my eyes. After 10 minutes I thought I was going to hate it, but after 30 minutes I was utterly engrossed, getting used to the different characters and seeing the depth in them. The intensity of the relationships combined with the visceral work of farming create something incredibly powerful, and works incredibly well with the beautiful but unforgiving landscape. Although not one to watch while eating dinner or with the grandparents!

Plan 9 from Outer Space (Amazon) – Just as awful as everyone says it is. I wondered briefly whether it was just the terrible directing and acting that was making it bad and whether the story would have been salvageable with a bit more money for effects and talent. But I think the story was doomed as well, certainly by the time the aliens finished the interminable explanation of the plot towards the end I was wishing I’d never bothered finding out what the fuss was about. It wasn’t even entertainingly bad, just boring.

Gnomeo and Juliet (Amazon) – I put this on because I needed something relatively short and un-intensive to watch while eating lunch and couldn’t be bothered to browse too far on Amazon. I’m not sure why I feel the need to justify watching it, as actually it was pretty good. It managed to do something fresh with the tired Romeo and Juliet structure with an incredible number of Shakespeare references spread throughout. It’s bright and colourful, the voice acting is charismatic and it really did make me smile.

House on Haunted Hill (Amazon) – I’ve seen plenty of references and even spoofs of this over the year and although I’m not really a horror fan, figured I should probably see the original. Particularly given that it’s only 75 minutes long. It did feel a little like an episode of the Twilight Zone or something rather than a film, and to be honest, not a particularly outstanding episode at that. The viciousness of the husband and wife was possibly the most interesting thing going on, the horror itself just a bit cheesy and the plot was sadly riddled with things that made no sense at all. Still, with that runtime, it’s worth a watch.

The Intern (Netflix) – I’d completely blanked this film thinking it was going to be cheesy at best, and insulting at worst. A friend recommended it and I am delighted I listened to her. It was utterly charming. At every point that they could have made a character annoying, or made fun of them, they stepped to the side and made every character well rounded, believable and the star of their own story. It would have been so easy to make the female manager a bitch, or the loud intern a sleaze, or the senior returning to work dismissive and bitter. But they didn’t and it made the film an absolute joy to watch.

Whatever Happened to Baby Jane (Amazon) – I enjoy the opportunity to catch up on classics like this, particularly ones where I have managed to avoid being spoiled on the plot and ending. All I knew about it was a bit of the background on the making of the film from the TV series Feud about the relationship between the two lead actresses, but as I’d never got to the end of the series I didn’t know more than the set up really, which added to the nuance of the film nicely I thought. Crawford and Davis are superb and the back and forth, twists and turns between the sister are fascinating, even if the various motives for how the car accident happened never made any sense.

Soylent Green (Amazon) – Even being spoiled on the ending, it’s still very possible to enjoy the film. Watching the characters work their way towards the answer is just as satisfying, and frankly I’m not sure how much of a surprise the ending actually is. Charlton Heston is reliable as ever, but it’s Edward G Robinson’s final performance that is absolutely heart-breaking. The grit and haze of the world is visceral and still very relevant today, although the complete avoidance of discussion of the use of women as ‘furniture’ passed from owner to owner of a building is pretty depressing.

The Conjuring (Amazon) – A perfectly fine horror film, but it didn’t really stand out for me. The cast is full of actors from TV that are very good, but made it feel a little televisual, I think also due to the constrained location and the 70s setting as well the whole thing just felt a little on the cheap side. There were a lot of bits that made me jump, and some really creepy stuff, but by the end it felt like it was just throwing everything together and I rather disconnected.

Rewatches
Ponyo (Gake no ue no Ponyo) (Film 4) – Studio Ghibli films are pretty weird at the best of times, but I think this one may have freaked me out the most. The weird fish with human faces really creeped me out for some reason. Other than that, it’s everything you’d expect from Studio Ghibli, very heavy handed environmental messaging combined with an imaginative and lovely story and charming characters. I watched the dubbed version and other than finding Liam Neeson irritating (as I always do) it was very well done.

The Blind Side (Amazon) – I first saw this a year after Sandra Bullock won the Oscar for it, and I was expecting one of those films that’s their only to support the lead actor/actresses in their quest to win an award, films with superb performances at their core, but surrounded by an aura of worthiness and angst that often doesn’t lead to a very interesting package. The Blind Side however was absolutely wonderful. As the opening speech started I literally stopped eating my dinner and became engrossed. Then I rewound it to watch it again. When I got to the end of the film, I rewound it again and could happily have watched the whole thing over again. It was a really lovely film, full of far more humour and excitement than angst or worthiness. The lead character is doing something wonderful for a kid, giving him a chance, but she doesn’t want to make a fuss about it, so the film doesn’t either – it’s just the way it is. I’m not sure anything about Sandra Bullock’s performance really deserved an Oscar, but she deserved it completely just for being able to play this kind of real world character in such an understated way that she just breaks your heart. A really, really, utterly wonderful film, that’s just as good on a second watch.

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