Books in October

Tim Harford – Fifty Things that Made the Modern Economy
Economics is a subject I always wish I understood more, but it doesn’t seem to matter how much I read or study, it just doesn’t seem to stick in my head. Tim Harford makes economics both interesting and accessible and this book is a great illustrator of a lot of core ideas to the subject. There are 50 chapters on different physical things, or non-tangible ideas that are each just a few pages long so really easy to pick up on tube journeys or while dinner is cooking. Harford’s style is so engaging, always using stories, examples and simple metaphors that it is a really easy to see how each ‘thing’ shaped the economy and in turn shaped the world (for good, bad and often both). This is one of those uncommon books that teaches you lots and entertains you while it does it.

Agatha Christie – Nemesis
Some may find Miss Marple’s meandering slowness endearing and relaxing, but I just find her a bit dull and this book really emphasized it without even trying to compensate for the character traits by having a more active plot. It felt like the whole thing just dragged and dragged. It was hard to get engaged in the case when you didn’t meet half of the key characters in the mystery and by the time the plot filled in, it felt very obvious to me who did it. Not one of Agatha Christie’s better works.

Ian Fleming – Dr No
I thought reading a James Bond book was probably one of those things I should tick off, although I do wonder how many people, even those that consider themselves James Bond fans have actually read one of the original books. I’m not a huge James Bond film fan, I’ve watched most of them I should think, but not with any real loyalty, just as a passable action film. I went into the book nervous at what James Bond written in the late 50’s would look like, when even in modern versions he’s a fair way from what I consider ‘acceptable behavior’. I wasn’t wrong to worry as the overt sexism and exploitation were pretty miserable to read. It completely overwhelmed any enjoyment I might have got from a solidly put together action novel. It’s not going to hold up well in terms of plot and action to modern thrillers, but it got the job done as a page turner. If you can ignore the “of it’s time” elements then I suppose it’s entertaining enough, but I’m not sure why you’d bother when there’s any number of modern thrillers that will avoid most of the issues.

Max Gladstone – The Craft Sequence 1: Three Parts Dead
I’m a bit torn on this book. On one hand it’s got a fairly original premise – magic and religion are kind of like contracts and trading – power, belief, terms and conditions. So lawyers are at the heart of it all. That’s an elegant idea, but I didn’t think it was very well introduced or developed. There was a bit too much going on for a first novel, and as I didn’t understand how the world was working, I couldn’t get lost in the schemes and subversion of the rules. The characters were all solid, I think the plot just about hung together and it was very readable; I just didn’t quite feel it was quite there.

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