Books in December 2020

Three books to polish off the year, and unfortunately they were all a bit disappointing. Check back in a couple of days for my overall review of the year.

Francine Toon – Pine
According to the review quote on the cover of this novel it’s “A literary gothic thriller to chill the marrow” (Guardian). It’s not. It’s utterly unthrilling. I wasn’t chilled, I was bored. It’s also described as a crime novel but given that the majority of the book is vague on whether a crime has even been committed it. It’s only the last quarter or so of the book that actually has any plot happen and it’s way too little, too late and too rushed. Another problem is that the story is told from the point of view of a young girl (10ish?), a point of view I always find tedious as they’re incredibly unreliable narrators, and a lazy writing technique as it gives an easy excuse for simplifying everything and building up the mystery because they’re not part of the conversations grown ups have that would immediately fill in the gaps. It’s clumsy and boring.

Jenni Murray – A History of the World in 21 Women: A Personal Selection
The good thing about a book like this is that it introduces you to (or reminds you of) a lot of different people from completely different times and places. But the bad thing is that with only about 10-15 pages per person you only get a very high level summary of where they lived and what they did. It’s a bit like reading a curated set of wikipedia pages, or a weird speed dating session. Jenni Murray is not an expert on any of the people in question, or their fields, and while she is a good journalist, I did feel that a lot of the sections were more editorial exercises summarising/combining other works than they were original writing. The best sections are those later in the book with modern subjects, many of whom Murray has met and interviewed which allowed her to add a more personal touch and something more original.

Ernest Cline – Ready Player 2
I loved Ready Player 1. It was a fun adventure romp that managed to capture the joyous spirit of what it meant to be a geek – getting lost in the things you love and finding a group of people to share those passions with. Ready Player 2 was a huge disappointment. In my review of the first book I said that I didn’t think it was necessarily a ‘good’ one, but it was the right one and it made me happy. It’s like Cline took the opposite direction – it makes perfect sense that having got all he wanted the lead character would turn into a bit of a dick, but just because it makes sense doesn’t mean that it makes for good reading. I also got deeply bored and frustrated by the quest sections which spent way too much time in a very small number of settings that I was personally not interested in the slightest. The book eventually picked up and got some momentum, but I was really just disappointed.

One thought on “Books in December 2020

  1. Pingback: Books I read in 2020 – Narrative Devices

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