Oscars 2021 – Short films

I went hunting for some of the Oscar short films, the live action ones are all available via Curzon Home Cinema, or a couple are on Netflix. I only found two of the animated ones (one on Netflix and one on Disney+). Unfortunately most of them were rather disappointing, many of them with the same low content density as many full length films do. Overall a bit of a slog.

Live Action

The Letter Room – Elvira Lind and Sofia Sondervan
The story of a prison custodian, given the job of checking prisoner mail. At 33 minute, this had plenty of opportunity to tell several different stories, an insight into the lives of lots of different prisoners, as well as the guard himself. Instead it focuses almost entirely on one prisoner and while that was a really interesting idea, it just wasn’t enough. The second story that’s thrown in feels like it might have got lost a bit in the edit, maybe the two stories were originally balanced but then the second story fell away, and it was left just not really enough to be worth the extra time on the running order. An opportunity missed and a boring result.

The Present – Ossama Bawardi and Farah Nabulsi (available on Netflix)
The story of a man and his daughter going to get a gift, except that they need to cross a checkpoint in the West Bank and that’s a slog and a humiliation that it’s hard for us to understand. It’s the type of short film that does give a good insight into a world that I know nothing about, but given I knew so little while I understood some of the feelings, I didn’t understand the politics or history that were driving it. Why were the soldiers assholes – was it just their nature or was there context I didn’t understand. That frustration (and another drawn out runtime that could have been cut down) left me slightly underwhelmed.

Feeling Through – Doug Roland and Susan Ruzenski
A young man with his own problems encounters a deaf and blind man seeking assistance. This is a good use of the short film format, giving a quick insight into the lives of people we don’t encounter, it’s not a deep insight, but it’s just enough to make you think. It’s a very natural and very sweet story that has stuck with me

Two Distant Strangers – Travon Free and Martin Desmond Roe (available on Netflix)
The concept is really well thought out, a ground hog day version of all the ways a day can go catastrophically wrong for a black man in New York. It has a powerful message about black lives matter that is impossible to not engage with, but a lot of that power is almost inherited and unfortunately I think the film actually pushes slightly too hard and turns from powerful to bludgeoning. It is however very well put together, visually interesting, very well acted and creative and only about 5 minutes too long rather than 20 minutes like the others, so the best of them all.

White Eye – Shira Hochman and Tomer Shushan
This is a 10 minute idea dragged out to 20 minutes. In hindsight I can see that everything plays out in real time (possibly even in one single shot – which is a good technical achievement) gives a sense of reality to it that would have been damaged if it had been edited down. But to keep the runtime there just needed to be a bit more going on, less passivity from the supporting characters, or expanding backstories, or even just cut the length by simplifying the story (don’t have the police come and go and then come back). Visually it wasn’t interesting enough to keep the attention (just a dark street corner) and nothing was lively enough.

Animated films
Burrow – Michael Capbarat and Madeline Sharafian (Disney+)
The story of a little bunny trying to dig a home. This is just delightful. It’s just 6 minutes long (5.5 if you don’t count the credits) and in that short time I smiled, laughed and very loudly went “Aw!”. There’s nothing really groundbreaking here (pardon the pun), the animation style is simple and classic, the story and themes could have come straight from a fairy tale and the resolution is fairly predictable, but it’s just a warm hug to watch.

If Anything Happens I Love You – Michael Govier and Will McCormack (Netflix)
There’s some really very beautiful animation that is extremely simple but interesting to look at, and conveying a lot of emotion in a very small number of lines and frames. But I found the storyline a bit muddled though, jumping about a bit too much, I think the elegance with which the emotions were portrayed was maybe enough to stand by itself without actually needing to jump around so much.

Genius Loci – Adrien Mérigeau and Amaury Ovise
The trailer for this made me want to run a mile. I have zero clue what it was about, it seemed like the kind of thing that would be running in a modern art gallery and I’d completely fail to understand.

Opera – Erick Oh
The trailer tells you absolutely nothing. In fact I thought I was just watching the little animated logo of the production company.

Yes-People – Arnar Gunnarsson and Gísli Darri Halldórsson
This was the only trailer that actually made me want to watch the film. The animation had personality and it looked amusing and entertaining.

One thought on “Oscars 2021 – Short films

  1. Pingback: Oscars 2021 – Narrative Devices

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