Books in September 2021

I had a couple of weeks off work and spent a chunk of that time reading slightly trashy novels, proper holiday stuff to just get lost in without too much thought or emotional trauma, and apparently television personalities are the place to go to for that.

Richard Osman – The Man Who Died Twice
Because of my love of Richard Osman I read his first novel within days of publication and described it as “a lovely little murder mystery”. Well it went on to sell over a million copies and top the charts for weeks on end. Osman is a genius in many ways and whether he carefully engineered his book to be so popular or it happened by accident, he’s managed to deliver the same trick again with his second novel. It’s got vibrant, relatable characters who it’s nice to spend time with; mysteries that twist and turn; a lightness of touch that makes it very easy to read; but also some emotional punch to make it feel substantial. I read the whole thing in just a couple of sittings, perfect for curling up with on an autumn afternoon.

Graham Norton
Holding – I read all three of Graham Norton’s books over a couple of weeks. I started with Holding and was immediately gripped. It’s a gentle mystery/thriller set in a small Irish town with a lot of vibrant characters and a lot of history and it just leapt off the page. It’s got enough depth to it to keep it engaging and to have some impact, but not so much as to really challenge. I enjoyed getting lost in it for a few hours and it was perfect for sitting in the garden with a cup of tea and some biscuits.

A Keeper – Of the three books I’ve read by Graham Norton this was the weakest and least interesting. The story didn’t quite ring true for me, and the construction of the novel with jumping time frames didn’t land well. All the drama was in the past but that meant they lacked jeopardy because you know how it ends, and the mystery of the details was completely predictable. Meanwhile the present day bits just felt contrived, relying on a series of random meetings and awkwardly contrived memories to fill in what was happening in the past. It’s perfectly readable, it’s well written and some of the smaller details really ring true, but the overall plot was a bit meh. (728)

Home Stretch – This is Norton’s third book and you can see how his writing has evolved, certainly this book does a much better job playing with multiple timelines than his previous novel ‘A Keeper’ did. The plot just about hangs together, although it does rely on some coincidences and character choices that stretch belief a little bit. This is a gentle book to read; for the characters there are big dramas and mysteries, but it’s told in such a light way that as a reader I didn’t feel anywhere near that level of tension or intrigue. That worked well for me, it’s a light read, with strong characters and an evocative but easy way of describing people and places that’s really immersive and I found myself reading big chunks at a time because it was just so comfortable to keep reading.

Claudia Winkleman – Quite
This book is like being in Claudia Winkleman’s head, and that may not be everyone’s idea of wonderful but she’s one of my favourite people and this felt like being her friend. The book is a compilation of short pieces that are somewhere between biography and advice column, at times it feels a bit too specific (it mostly assumes the reader is a woman seeking a relationship with a man), but it’s also very sweet and kind of empowering. It’s sweet and funny and her voice absolutely rings out through the whole thing. The sections are all very short and reading it at any length feels a little bit overwhelming, but in small doses it’s lovely.

S.J. Bennett – The Windsor Knot
There’s a murder at Windsor Castle, the police and security services seem to be barking up the wrong tree, so the Queen starts investigating herself. Yes, the Queen. It’s a quirky idea and kind of makes sense that the Queen is extremely smart, very knowledgeable, a bit peeved about a murder in her ‘house’ and is a little bit bored. The mystery itself is solid and well paced, the writing very easy to read, the supporting characters fun and the detail about the Royal Household convincing and engaging. However I felt slightly uncomfortable about the whole thing. Maybe if it hadn’t been set in the near present day it wouldn’t have felt quite so odd and intrusive, but I felt weirdly dirty about reading it and couldn’t quite get over that.

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